Technology and Supervision

In clinical fieldwork, supervision is used often to facilitate the growth of a new clinician into a specified field. Typically, supervision involves a currently licensed or certified professional, referred to as the supervisor, overseeing a new practitioner, referred to as the supervisee, who is seeking to pursue their license or certification. Supervision is carried out over many hours and in many different settings, and it also includes the compilation of many different activities. For example, supervision can be provided while the supervisee is providing therapy to a client, during 1:1 meetings discussing client goals and progress, or in a small group via video conference where educational material is applied to real-life scenarios.

With the growth of online technology, ways in which supervision is provided has evolved from in-person components to the use of live-streaming videos, video conferencing for meetings, or even the use of online platforms for consistent communication. This evolution of technology poses many positives, as well as potential negatives. For example, new clinicians in rural areas are having access to supervision which allows for a clinical expertise to be more widely accessible. Additionally, it allows for more flexibility of scheduling supervision hours since many fields require large amounts of hours to be completed prior to licensing or certification. One of the biggest potential negatives is that the use of this technology can pose issues with the confidentiality of clients or ethical issues that may be specific to a professional association.

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